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Dec 09
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disneydragons:

This is a day I will never forget. At long last, I’ve finally spotted the dragon. (My first one ever!)

Behold! The dragon in all its glory flying over New Fantasyland!

I didn’t see it for myself

Nov 24
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montereybayaquarium:

Tales from the A-scareium!
By Karen Jeffries
Over the years, some unusual paranormal activity has been reported by shocked staff and scared visitors. We thought we’d share some of the tales as Halloween approaches….
The Woman in Black
Our Security officers work around the clock, including during the aptly named graveyard shift. Several have reported odd sights, eerie sounds and hair-raising feelings during their late-night rounds.
Some reported the appearance – and sudden disappearance – of a woman in a black gown who haunts the Open Sea wing.  Via monitors inside the Security office, one saw her standing under the anchovy roundabout; the other watched her glide by the huge Open Sea exhibit. When they went to investigate, she was nowhere to be found!
One officer’s encounter was too close. Walking through the Ocean Travelers gallery, he passed a woman in a black gown sitting on a bench only a few feet away. She nodded, and he said “hello” and kept walking. He stopped abruptly a few steps later, thinking “Wait a minute!” but when he turned around, the woman had vanished.
Footprints from Nowhere
Another officer had the same experience on foggy nights. Large, wet footprints would appear out of nowhere on the sidewalk outside the Main Entrance. The footprints would always travel from the sidewalk underneath the locked main gate before disappearing.
Another officer heard the laughter of children, as if they were running and playing somewhere – but in this case it was the middle of the night and in the basement. “There are definitely wandering souls around here in the midnight hour,” he said.
The Man in the Yellow Plaid Shirt
Sales & Reservations Coordinator Janelle Brown was working at one of our entrances when she started noticing something out of the corner of her eye. Thinking it was a guest, she’d turn around but no one was there. This would happen repeatedly.
Janelle tried to ignore the urge to turn around, but out of the corner of her eye she saw a man’s hand resting on the desk. The hand would move closer until one time she saw not only the hand, but also an arm up to the elbow, inside a yellow plaid shirt. The vision disappeared instantly when she turned around.
One day she’d had enough and – out loud – asked her ghostly guest to stop pestering her. The number of encounters dropped after that, but Janelle said she’d always catch one glimpse of “the man in the yellow plaid shirt” every time she worked at that desk.
Visitors from Other Lands
Local author and historian Randall A. Reinstedt has written several books about ghostly goings-on around California, and especially  the Central Coast.  Both Ghost Notes and California Ghost Notes (available in the Aquarium’s Gift & Bookstore) feature episodes about haunted Monterey – including several reports from Aquarium staff seeing apparitions of Hovden Cannery workers.
One chilling story involves a woman who visited with her husband and daughter in 1996, the debut year of the Outer Bay (now Open Sea) galleries.  As the family marveled at the shimmering school of anchovies at the gallery entrance, the woman felt a hand on her shoulder, heard someone whisper in her ear and felt breath on her hair. The voice was soft and foreign. Thinking it was another visitor, the woman turned around but saw no one except for her family, still watching the anchovy exhibit.
She realized they didn’t have the same experience, which unsettled her enough that she quickly went to the bookstore to feel safe around people – living ones, that is….
Do you have your own A-scareium story? We’d love to hear it!

montereybayaquarium:

Tales from the A-scareium!

By Karen Jeffries

Over the years, some unusual paranormal activity has been reported by shocked staff and scared visitors. We thought we’d share some of the tales as Halloween approaches….

The Woman in Black

Our Security officers work around the clock, including during the aptly named graveyard shift. Several have reported odd sights, eerie sounds and hair-raising feelings during their late-night rounds.

Some reported the appearance – and sudden disappearance – of a woman in a black gown who haunts the Open Sea wing.  Via monitors inside the Security office, one saw her standing under the anchovy roundabout; the other watched her glide by the huge Open Sea exhibit. When they went to investigate, she was nowhere to be found!

One officer’s encounter was too close. Walking through the Ocean Travelers gallery, he passed a woman in a black gown sitting on a bench only a few feet away. She nodded, and he said “hello” and kept walking. He stopped abruptly a few steps later, thinking “Wait a minute!” but when he turned around, the woman had vanished.

Footprints from Nowhere

Another officer had the same experience on foggy nights. Large, wet footprints would appear out of nowhere on the sidewalk outside the Main Entrance. The footprints would always travel from the sidewalk underneath the locked main gate before disappearing.

Another officer heard the laughter of children, as if they were running and playing somewhere – but in this case it was the middle of the night and in the basement. “There are definitely wandering souls around here in the midnight hour,” he said.

The Man in the Yellow Plaid Shirt

Sales & Reservations Coordinator Janelle Brown was working at one of our entrances when she started noticing something out of the corner of her eye. Thinking it was a guest, she’d turn around but no one was there. This would happen repeatedly.

Janelle tried to ignore the urge to turn around, but out of the corner of her eye she saw a man’s hand resting on the desk. The hand would move closer until one time she saw not only the hand, but also an arm up to the elbow, inside a yellow plaid shirt. The vision disappeared instantly when she turned around.

One day she’d had enough and – out loud – asked her ghostly guest to stop pestering her. The number of encounters dropped after that, but Janelle said she’d always catch one glimpse of “the man in the yellow plaid shirt” every time she worked at that desk.

Visitors from Other Lands

Local author and historian Randall A. Reinstedt has written several books about ghostly goings-on around California, and especially  the Central Coast.  Both Ghost Notes and California Ghost Notes (available in the Aquarium’s Gift & Bookstore) feature episodes about haunted Monterey – including several reports from Aquarium staff seeing apparitions of Hovden Cannery workers.

One chilling story involves a woman who visited with her husband and daughter in 1996, the debut year of the Outer Bay (now Open Sea) galleries.  As the family marveled at the shimmering school of anchovies at the gallery entrance, the woman felt a hand on her shoulder, heard someone whisper in her ear and felt breath on her hair. The voice was soft and foreign. Thinking it was another visitor, the woman turned around but saw no one except for her family, still watching the anchovy exhibit.

She realized they didn’t have the same experience, which unsettled her enough that she quickly went to the bookstore to feel safe around people – living ones, that is….

Do you have your own A-scareium story? We’d love to hear it!

Nov 12
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nprfreshair:

laughingsquid:

3D Printer Photo Booth Makes Figurines Instead of Photos
Tokyo’s stylish Harajuku district will soon be home to an unusual pop-up photo booth - customers will walk away not with photos, but with 3D printed figurines of themselves. The customers is first 3D scanned in a process that requires them to stand still for 15 minutes. A 3D model of the customer is then refined on a computer before output to a 3D printer. The figurines are available in sizes ranging from 4 to 8 inches. The 3D printer photo booth will be open November 24 to January 14, 2013. It is the work of Japanese creative studio PARTY.


It’s the democratization of the figurine… No need to be famous or a superhero to have a miniature version of yourself, to put on a shelf.

nprfreshair:

laughingsquid:

3D Printer Photo Booth Makes Figurines Instead of Photos

Tokyo’s stylish Harajuku district will soon be home to an unusual pop-up photo booth - customers will walk away not with photos, but with 3D printed figurines of themselves. The customers is first 3D scanned in a process that requires them to stand still for 15 minutes. A 3D model of the customer is then refined on a computer before output to a 3D printer. The figurines are available in sizes ranging from 4 to 8 inches. The 3D printer photo booth will be open November 24 to January 14, 2013. It is the work of Japanese creative studio PARTY.

It’s the democratization of the figurine… No need to be famous or a superhero to have a miniature version of yourself, to put on a shelf.

Nov 04
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Lots of fun!

Lots of fun!

Aug 19
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Muppets

Muppets

Permalink

montereybayaquarium:

 “Super Mom” Sea Otter, Joy, Dies

The Aquarium is sad to announce the death of Joy, its “Super Mom” who raised a record number of stranded sea otter pups, many of which were returned to the wild, where they’re raising pups of their own.

Joy, who was 14 years old, was humanely euthanized on August 1 in the Aquarium’s Animal Health Lab, because of failing health as a result of the infirmities of age.

The precocious sea otter was a keystone of the surrogacy program of the Aquarium’s Sea Otter Research and Conservation program. During her years at the Aquarium Joy raised 16 pups – more than any other surrogate in our history. She raised three pups on exhibit, helping prepare them for life at other U.S. aquariums. Joy did all this despite several medical setbacks during her years here.

“She was a ‘super mom’ for us – easily the most prolific of all our surrogate female otters,” said Karl Mayer, animal care coordinator with the sea otter program. His team also relied on Joy to serve as a companion to adult females it rescued because of illness or injuries.

On exhibit Joy was easy to identify with her blonde head, as well as her calm and maternal way with other animals. Her favorite toy was a large red ball she would roll on top of and sink in the water to release tidbits of food hidden inside. She enjoyed roughhousing with other otters, said Chris DeAngelo, the Aquarium’s associate curator of marine mammals.

“Joy was definitely the feistiest otter,” DeAngelo said. “She was quick to let you know when you crossed a line.” Joy would show her displeasure with her caretakers by screeching loudly if she thought they weren’t feeding her quickly enough, or if she otherwise didn’t like what they were doing.”

“From a medical perspective, she’s been a real fighter through some serious problems,” said Aquarium veterinarian Dr. Mike Murray. “She has shown a cat-like tendency to survive, and must have had at least nine lives.”

Joy was found stranded on Twin Lakes Beach in Santa Cruz in August 1998 as a five-day-old pup. She released herself during an ocean swim with an Aquarium staff member in December 1998. (At the time Aquarium staff would swim with pups to teach them foraging skills and acclimate them to the ocean. That practice has been discontinued in favor of female otters like Joy raising pups for release.)

Joy remained in the wild for nearly three years. Unfortunately, during that time, she interacted with kayakers and divers, which wasn’t safe for them or for Joy, so she was brought back to the Aquarium and became a permanent resident.

Joy was always willing to play with her exhibit mates as well as toys, which endeared her to Aquarium guests. As with all exhibit animals raised here, her name comes from John Steinbeck’s writings – in her case, a character from In Dubious Battle.

The Aquarium’s Sea Otter Research and Conservation program has been studying and trying to save the threatened southern sea otter since 1984 with the support of its research, exhibit and policy teams, and the backing of donors and members. To date, we’ve rescued nearly 600 ill and injured otters and returned many back to the wild. The surrogate program continues to raise and release stranded pups, and places non-releasable animals on exhibit in Monterey and at other accredited aquariums across North America.

The research team plays a key role in field studies of sea otters in California, Alaska and Russia. We also works on behalf of policies at the state and federal level that will advance the recovery of sea otter populations.

Jul 30
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